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Archaeology Open House Goes Sunday

Selkirk Students Explore Educational Opportunity at Slocan Narrows

 

A pair of Selkirk College students are gaining valuable insight and experience as part of the six-week Hamilton College field school taking place at the Slocan Narrows Pithouse Village.

Allysa Webber and Mike Graeme are two of the post-secondary students participating in the Slocan Narrows Archaeological Project just north of Lemon Creek. Work on the pithouse village has been taking place since 2000 when archeologists from the University of Montana and University of Lethbridge began the process of mapping out and exploring the footprints of the past. Almost 40 housepits have been identified and radiocarbon dating has revealed that four different periods of occupation exist stretching from approximately 3,105 years ago to the late 18th Century.

Archaeology Two Students

Allysa Webber and Mike Graeme are Selkirk College students participating in the Slocan Narrows Archaeological Project just north of Lemon Creek. Under the direction of New York state’s Hamilton College, the six-week field school will culminate with a Archeology Open House this Sunday between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome.

“It’s really amazing,” says Webber. “One of the very exciting aspects of the project is that we have the ability to put pieces together and figure out exactly what was happening at that time.”

This Sunday between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Webber and Graeme will join seven other students, three teaching assistants and the two Hamilton College project coordinators at the Archeology Open House. As the field school draws to a close, the open house will be an opportunity for students to guide the public through the importance of the site and what they have discovered since in mid-June. 

Read more about the open house and the two Selkirk College students in the full story at selkirk.ca

 

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